AFRICANA DEVELOPMENT STUDIES CERTIFICATE COURSE STUDENT STUDY GUIDE 2023-2024

Contents

Introduction. 4

Anton de Kom University of Suriname. 4

Faculty of Humanities. 5

Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (K.N.U.S.T.). 5

College of Humanities and Social Sciences. 5

Broos Institute. 6

Organization and working method. 7

Africana Development Studies. 8

Inception. 8

Collaborations. 8

Objectives of the Certificate Course. 8

Admission requirements. 9

Entry test 9

Learning outcomes for the certificate course. 9

Knowledge and understanding. 9

Applying knowledge and understanding. 9

Making judgments. 10

Learning skills. 10

Coordinator 10

Structure of the certificate course. 10

Duration. 11

Assessment 11

Closing. 11

Courses. 12

BLOCK ONE. 12

INTRODUCTION TO AFRICAN HISTORY 1. 12

INTRODUCTION TO AFRICAN HISTORY 2. 12

BLOCK TWO.. 14

IDENTITY, ETHNICITY AND DIVERSITY. 14

CULTURE, RELIGION AND SPIRITUALITY. 15

BLOCK THREE. 17

NATURE, LAND OWNERSHIP AND TRADITION.. 17

ECONOMY AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP. 18

BLOCK FOUR.. 20

UPBRINGING, NURTURE AND FAMILY RELATIONSHIPS. 20

POLITICAL GOVERNANCE AND LEADERSHIP. 21

Lecturers. 22

Introduction

In this study guide you will find relevant information about the Africana Development Studies Certificate Course including inception, admission requirements and objectives, structure of the course, descriptions of the units of study and lecturer contact information.

The certificate course is offered by the Faculty of Humanities of the Anton de Kom University of Suriname. For more information about the university and the faculty please visit the university website www.adekus.uvs.edu.

Anton de Kom University of Suriname

The University of Suriname was founded November 1, 1968 as a continuation of the Medical School (1882) and the Surinamese School of Law. The Faculty of Legal Sciences (1968) and the Faculty of Medicine (1969) were the first faculties in the initial phase of the University. In 1975 the proclamation of the Socio-Economic Faculty took place. The Faculty of Science (1976) and the Faculty of Technology (1977) were subsequently established.

The University was reorganized in the period 1980-1987. The institution was renamed Anton de Kom University of Suriname (1983) and the five (5) faculties were reduced to three (3). The Faculty of Science and the Faculty of Technology were merged into the Faculty of Technological Sciences. The Faculty of Legal Sciences and the Socio-Economic Faculty were brought together in the Faculty of Social Sciences. The Medical School became the Faculty of Medical Sciences.

As of 1 January 2017, the Faculty of Legal Sciences has again become an independent School and is no longer part of the Faculty of Social Sciences.

Administrative organization of the Anton de Kom University of Suriname

The highest administrative body of our institution is the University Board (BvU). The BvU consists of nine (9) members, six (6) of which are appointed and three (3) are elected by the members of the University community.

The current Board is composed as follows:

– Prof. Dr. Shanti Venetiaan                                      chairperson

– Drs. Mohamed – Shiraz Boedhoe LLM                  secretary

– Dr. Johannes Breeveld                                            member

– Dr. Mohamed Rakieb Khudabux                            member

– Drs. Andreas Talea                                                  member

– Mr. John Sandriman                                                member

– Drs. Astrieta Lachmon – Alakhramsing                 member

– Mr. Sunilkumar Mahabir                                        member

– Mr. Hakiem Lalmahomed                                       member

The BvU is responsible for the overall management of the University, both in its entirety and in its components. The Chairperson of the BvU represents the University in and out of court.

Faculty of Humanities

The Faculty of Humanities (FdHum) was proclaimed in 2010 and is currently one of the youngest Faculties of the AdeKUS. FdHum is the center for the humanities, a broad academic area that covers a wide spectrum of disciplines that include Cultural Sciences, History and Language.

Organizational structure of the FdHum

All faculties of the AdeKUS are led by a Faculty Board. The current and de facto representation of the FdHum Faculty Board is as follows:

  • Dean                                       Mrs. Carol Bobson, married Overman
  • Secretary                                Dr. Eric Jagdew

Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (K.N.U.S.T.)

College of Humanities and Social Sciences

The College of Humanities and Social Sciences (CoHSS) of the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (K.N.U.S.T.), Kumasi, Ghana, is one of the six colleges of K.N.U.S.T. established during a restructuring in 2004 with the purpose of repositioning and refocusing the University in undertaking its core business of teaching, research and service. CoHSS is currently the largest college in the University with the faculties: Social Sciences, Business School; and Law School. In addition there are fourteen departments and two research centers. CoHSS remains a pinnacle of knowledge in the humanities and social sciences for all colleges and faculties in the University, offering various courses to the numerous departments in the University (K.N.U.S.T., CoHSS, 2017, https://cohss.knust.edu.gh/about-us/welcome-message).

CoHSS is collaborating with various faculties at K.N.U.S.T. through the Committee for the Collaboration between K.N.U.S.T. and the Anton de Kom University of Suriname with the objective of providing a dynamic educational experience about the African Diaspora. The objective of the collaboration is to broaden insights into African Diaspora history, culture, identity, education, entrepreneurship and leadership that can promote socio-cultural and socio-economic development. This process has presented a cadre of lecturers with a corpus of knowledge complementary to the scope and objectives of the certificate course. The K.N.U.S.T. lecturers will either be the sole lecturer for a course or act as a guest lecturer.

The organizational structure of CoHSS is composed as follows

  • Prof. Charles Marfo               Provost of the College of Humanities and Social Sciences
  • Prof. Kabila Abass                  Dean, Faculty of Social Sciences
  • Prof. Grace Nkansah Asante  Vice Dean, Faculty of Social Sciences

 

Broos Institute

The Broos Institute (formerly the Bigi Bon Schools Foundation) was established in 2021; Chamber of Commerce Registration no.  86290916 and Fiscal no. 863921838. The Broos Institute is located at Entrada 300, 1114AA Amsterdam/Duivendrecht, the Netherlands. The Broos Institute aims to promote high-quality primary, secondary and scientific education in a broad context, with a focus on the background of the individual student.

The Broos Institute believes that equal opportunities in education can only be achieved through truly inclusive and connected learning. The Broos Institute therefore stands for:

  • an educational structure in which students can progress smoothly to the level that suits them and they are free to experiment with subjects that excite them;
  • teaching methods and curricula in which students see themselves reflected in a positive and motivating way;
  • educational support that empowers all students and matches their dreams;
  • teaching staff who reflect the real world in culture, knowledge, skills and worldview; and
  • education that prepares young and old to be successful in a rapidly changing labor market and an even more rapidly changing world.

The Broos Institute connects with the cultural experience of its pupils and students. It offers an Afro-centric experience within the European educational landscape. People of African descent will find a study environment that recognizes, respects and encourages their unique perspective. Within the pillars of the Broos Institute, students from all other cultural backgrounds enjoy the opportunity to be enriched by education provided from a decolonial perspective.

The Broos Institute is named after Kabiten Broos (1821-1880). He was a hero of the slave resistance in Suriname, South America and leader of the People of Achter het Bos (behind the forest) also known as Weglooperskamp (runaway camp), a self-standing group consisting of the escaped enslaved.

From this camp, Kabiten Broos fought against the colonizer’s rule and attacked plantations to free enslaved people.

Kabiten Broos was invited to Paramaribo to talk about peace between the colonial government and the runaway camp after many failed attempts by the colonial militia. During this meeting a photo of Broos was taken and is the only photo of a Black Surinamese anti-slavery fighter at the time.

Organization and working method

The Broos Institute consists of four pillars: Support, Campus, Academy and Research. These four pillars work together at different levels on connected education in the Netherlands.

The Broos Institute imposes a number of requirements for education:

1. Education is decolonized (not just Eurocentric)

2. Education offers equal development opportunities to all students, regardless of the origin or educational level of their parents

3. Education trains people for citizenship and leadership

4. Education leads to innovation

5. Education leads to greater opportunities in the labor market

The organizational structure of the current board is composed as follows

–    Marvin Hokstam                        Executive Director

   –    Marciano Daans                         Chairman

   –    Otmar Watson                            Vice Chairman

   –    Ama Carr                                    Secretary

Africana Development Studies

 

Inception

On November 23, 2018 His Majesty the King Otumfuo Osei Tutu II, the Asenthene, king of the Ashantis from Ghana, visited the Anton de Kom University of Suriname (AdeKUS). He gave a public lecture “THE ROLE OF A TRADITIONAL KING IN A CONTEMPORARY NATION-STATE”, which was greatly appreciated.

During that visit, the University Board of the AdeKUS proposed cooperation with the African (Ghanaian) universities and in particular the establishment of a chair in “African-Surinamese Cultural and Philosophy Studies”, to which His Majesty the King immediately pledged his full support.

In the same year, a study was carried out into the need to set up a training course on African-Surinamese studies. Based on the results of this study, a certificate course was developed and aimed at knowledge development on and research into history from an African-Surinamese perspective. The first course was offered in October 2022.

Collaborations

In 2024 AdeKUS FdHum will expand its framework and audience by collaborating with the K.N.U.S.T. of Ghana and the Broos Institute of the Netherlands. Collaboration with each of these organizations will expand the pool of African Diaspora academics and researchers to offer our students a more robust body of knowledge. Our collaborative effort with K.N.U.S.T. will provide students with a core body of lecturers from within its College of Humanities and Social Sciences, who are established academics in each of the topics offered. In addition we anticipate cross pollinating research interests.

The collaboration with Broos Institute will expand our student body to the Netherlands via online courses and academically trained lecturers drawn from the African Diaspora. We remain committed to the original concept of providing an Afro-Surinamese perspective when applicable, but with a broader approach to capture the experience of the African Diaspora. To reflect the collaboration the original name, Afro-Surinamese Development Studies Certificate Course is now Africana Development Studies Certificate Course.

Objectives of the Certificate Course

The general aim of the Africana Development Studies Certificate Course is that participants contribute to broadening insights and perspectives on history, culture, identity, education, entrepreneurship and leadership with the purpose of stimulating and strengthening the socio-cultural and socio-economic development of the African Diaspora.

The participants can contribute to:

1. The development or spread of activities aimed at promoting the development of African Diaspora groups and individuals. (development role)

2. The implementation of policy aimed at the socio-cultural and socio-economic interests of the African Diaspora. (policy implementation)

3. Exploratory research into the problems, potentials and achievements of the African Diaspora target groups. (research role)

4. Providing input for rewriting African Diaspora history. (emancipatory role)

Admission requirements

In order to participate in this course prospective participants must have:

1. a VOS diploma (Secondary Education) or a diploma equivalent to a VOS diploma by the BOS department of the Government of Suriname Ministry of Education, Science and Culture.

2. If the prospective participant does not have a VOS diploma, but has otherwise developed a comparable thinking and working level, an entry test will be taken to determine whether she/he can still be admitted.

Note: The prospective participant must write down his/her motivation for participating in the course on the application form.

Entry test

Prospective participants who do not have a VOS diploma may be permitted to participate in the course after successful completion of an entry test. This test is taken prior to the start of the course. After that the prospective participant may register for one or more courses.

Learning outcomes for the certificate course

Upon completion of the Africana Development Studies Certificate Course, the following learning outcomes will have been achieved.

Knowledge and understanding

The participants:

1. know the main features of African Diaspora history in relation to African history and philosophy

2. are familiar with African Diaspora  perspectives on identity, ethnicity, diversity, nature and culture, religion and spirituality, land ownership and tradition, leadership and their mutual cohesion and are able to appreciate these

3. have knowledge of the achievements of the African Diaspora community relevant for their (further) reinforcement in a material and immaterial sense

Applying knowledge and understanding

The participants are able to:

4. contribute to research and policy aimed at the socio-cultural and socio-economic strengthening of the Africana Diaspora community

Making judgments

The participants are able to:

5. analyze socio-cultural issues from an African Diaspora perspective

6. conduct a basic (literature) research on African Diaspora history with supervision

Communication skills

The participants are able to:

7. report and communicate both orally and in writing about African Diaspora themes

Learning skills

The participants:

8. have developed learning skills that enable them to further their professional development

Coordinator

Dr. Cheryl White (cheryl.white@uvs.edu)

Structure of the certificate course

Participants can enroll annually. The complete course is made up of four blocks consisting of two courses each (table 1). The four blocks are related to each other. Each block lasts six months and four courses will be offered per year. Block 1 will be repeated annually as it lays the foundation for all three subsequent blocks, in terms of knowledge and skills (table 2). In block 1, the participants develop knowledge and skills for writing a paper after a desk study or exploratory field research. The participant can only partake in block 2, 3 and/or 4 after block 1 is completed.

Table 1: Overview of the individual courses

BLOCK 1Introduction to African history 1
Introduction to African history 2
  
BLOCK 2Identity, ethnicity and diversity
Culture, religion and spirituality
  
BLOCK 3  Nature, land ownership, tradition
Economy and entrepreneurship
  
BLOCK 4Upbringing, nurture and family relationships
Political governance and leadership

Table 2: Incidental schedule for the courses offered 2024-2025

PeriodYear 1     Year 2
Quarter 1 (march- may)      Blok 1A    3A
Quarter 2 (june-aug)      Blok 1B    3B
Quarter 3 (aug-oct)    Blok 2A    4A
Quarter 4 (oct-dec)      Blok 2B    4B

Duration

Each course has a duration of 10 weeks, unless stated otherwise, and consist of:

Contact hours: 7 weeks of interactive lectures, 2 weeks of research and a presentation in the last week.    

Independent study hours: Literature research (140 – 150 pages), preparatory assignments and research. Literature/field research will be conducted for 2 weeks. The following, final week participants will prepare a paper and give a presentation.

The total packages of the eight (8) courses lasts 80 weeks, spread over two (2) years. The study load is 14 hours per week (140 hours per 10-week course). The course days are Tuesday and Friday from 4 pm to 7 pm. The courses are offered online.  In addition, it is expected that the participants will spend approximately 8 hours per week on individual study.

Assessment

Each course is concluded with a paper. The assessment of the papers is based on a rubric. Papers are preferably written in English, because of the collaboration with the K.N.U.S.T.  and to allow greater accessibility to the content of the papers. The papers will be bundled and will be available to third parties.


Closing

Participants who have successfully completed all four blocks (consisting of eight courses) will receive a Certificate of Achievement. Participants who have completed a block consisting of two (closely linked) courses will receive a Certificate of Completion.

Courses

BLOCK ONE
Course 1INTRODUCTION TO AFRICAN HISTORY 1  
Contact hour/block48h (lectures and seminars) 92h (independent study)
CodeBlock1A
Credit points 5
AdeK Lecturer N/A
K.N.U.S.T.  LecturerDr. Michael Nimoh, Dept. of History and Political Studies, FoSS
Broos LecturerTBA
Course descriptionIntroduction to the history of Africa before and after the arrival of the EuropeansPeriodization of authors/thinkers about Africa and their vision
Learning objectivesThe participant should be able to: relay the inception of Africa and the decolonization process;write a paper on the implications of Africa in a select country of the Diaspora; and discuss and contrast the vision of Harari and Trevor on Africa, and form an independent opinion.  
  
Mode of instructionInteractive lecturesSeminarsDiscussions
PrerequisitesNone
Mode of assessment Paper (desk study consisting of 1500-2000 words)
Assessment weightPaper 100%
Literature Harari, Y. (2015) Sapiens. A Brief History of Mankind. London, Vintage Reader designed by the lecturer
Course 2INTRODUCTION TO AFRICAN HISTORY 2  
Contact hours/block48h (lectures and seminars) 92h (independent study)  
CodeBlock 1B
Credit points 5
AdeKUS LecturerLucinda Pinas; Dr. Drachtenstein (Guest Lecturer); Dr. Leo Balai (Guest lecturer)
K.N.U.S.T.  LecturerDr. Michael Nimoh, Dept. of History and Political Studies, FoSS; Dr. Ali Yakubu Nyaaba,
Broos LecturerTo be determined Dr. Rhoda Arrindell
Course description Introduction to the history of Africa before and after the arrival of the EuropeansPeriodization of authors/thinkers about Africa and their vision
Learning objectives  The participant should be able to: form an opinion on the relationship between Africa and the African Diaspora;distinguish between and explain the diversity of African cultures in the Diaspora;carry out a field assignment on an aspect of African-Diaspora history and present the results.
Mode of instructionInteractive lecturesSeminarsField assignmentPresentation  
PrerequisitesBlock1A
Mode of assessment Paper Participants will write a paper on a conducted field assignment in a provided format.     Presentation Participants will present research findings according to expectations.
Assessment weightPresentation     40% Paper                   60%   Please take note: both partial assessments are required to determine the final grade. Each needs to be a minimum of 5.5 in order to successfully complete the course.
LiteratureReader designed by lecturer
BLOCK TWO
Course  3IDENTITY, ETHNICITY AND DIVERSITY
Contact hours/block48h (lectures and seminars) 92h (independent study)  
CodeBlock 2A
Credit points 5
AdeKUS LecturerDr. Maureen Silos  (Suriname)
K.N.U.S.T.  LecturerDr. Adwoa Owusuaa Bobie, Center for Cultural and African Studies, CoHSS
Broos LecturerTBD
Course descriptionThis course responds to the need of (Afro) Surinamese and citizens of the broader African Diaspora to have sufficient opportunities to explore their ethnic identities in a historical, decolonial, cultural and intersectional perspective. Some questions that arise here are: What is meant by ‘ethnicity’ and ‘identity’ within the African Diaspora and African context? What tensions or conflicts arise in identity formation? Which perspectives and insights can contribute to the discussion about an select African Diaspora identity in relation to ethnicity and diversity?  
Learning objectives  The participant should be able to: explain the conceptualization and perspectives of identity, ethnicity and diversity in an African, African Diaspora context;articulate African perspectives on the interrelationship of the concepts of identity, ethnicity vs. race and diversity;explain the political, economic, religious and cultural interrogations in the formation of an African, African Diaspora identity, in the ethnic experience from a historical and decolonial perspective;after a basic field study, develop concrete strategies to strengthen the formation of the African Diaspora identity and to deal with the conflicts that arise.  
Mode of instruction  Interactive lectures Seminars Field assignment
PrerequisitesBlock 1 completed successfully.
Mode of assessmentPaper Participants will write a paper on an executed field assignment in a provided format.    Presentation Participants will present research findings according to expectations.  
Assessment weightPresentation     40% Paper                   60%   Please take note: both partial assessments are required to determine the final grade. Each needs to be a minimum of 5.5 in order to successfully complete the course.
LiteratureDetermined by lecturer 
Course 4CULTURE, RELIGION AND SPIRITUALITY
Contact hours/block 48h (lectures and seminars) 92h (independent study)
CodeBlock2B
Credit points 5
AdeKUS LecturerProf. Dr. Franklin Jabini (Suriname)
K.N.U.S.T.  LecturerDr. Charles Prempeh, Center for Cultural and African Studies, College of Humanities and Social Sciences (CoHSS); Mr. Eric Manu, Department of Religious Studies, Faculty of Social Science (FoSS)
Broos LecturerTBD
Course descriptionCulture, religion and spirituality are important spheres within every society and of every nation. The well-being and prosperity of that society and that people are largely determined by the influences they undergo within these spheres of life, and certainly when this has happened at the level of slavery and colonization. It is therefore relevant to study the spiritual practices African Diaspora communities and African society in this case, to identify the connections between them and to determine the impact of cultural domination on the cultural integrity of these societies.  
Learning objectives  The participant should be able to: describe in your own words the historical connection between relevant African cultures and select African Diaspora communities;name the characteristics of African and African Diaspora cultural, religious and spiritual practices and express their coherence in your own words;explain the way in which culture, religion and spirituality have developed in select communities of the African Diaspora;explain the role and influence of the world religions, Christianity and Islam respectively, have played and have had within the system of colonization of African peoples and the African Diaspora;describe in your own words the influence of the world religions’ Christianity and Islam, on the spiritual well-being and cultural integrity of these societies;recognize the different forms of cultural domination and argue their influence on mental, cultural and economic development.  
Mode of instruction  Interactive lecturesSeminars Field assignment
PrerequisitesBlock 1 completed successfully. Block2A
Prerequisites for assessmentRegistered for the course and >80% attendance and participation.
Mode of assessmentPaper Participants will write a paper on a conducted field assignment in a provided format.    Presentation Participants will present research findings according to expectations.
Assessment weightPresentation     40% Paper                   60% Please take note: both partial assessments are required to determine the final grade. Each needs to be a minimum of 5.5 in order to successfully complete the course.
Literature  Determined by lecturer.
BLOCK THREE
Course 5NATURE, LAND OWNERSHIP AND TRADITION
Contact hours/block 48h (lectures and seminars) 92h (independent study)  
CodeBlock 3A
Credit points 5
AdeKUS LecturerDrs. Salomon Emanuels   (Suriname)
K.N.U.S.T.  LecturerDr. Kwabena Obeng Asiama, Land Economy, College of Art and Built Environment (CABE)
Broos LecturerTBD
Course descriptionWithin the African and African Diaspora cultures, land has various meanings and functions, which may be linked to and influenced by a lineage descent system, views on life, traditions, community building and natural conditions. For example, in Suriname various land ownership regimes exist within the tribal communities in the interior and the city, with their own characteristics, possibilities and limitations. What strategies have communities adopted to survive within those regimes and what barriers do they still face in the pursuit of prosperity and well-being?
Learning objectives  The participant should be able to: argue how African and African Diaspora cultural traditions influence access to land, land ownership and the use of flora and fauna and vice versa;distinguish the characteristics and forms of communal land ownership in a select African Diaspora community and place in the context of land rights;make recommendations based on (literature) research on how to use land alongside other relevant local ecological systems in the context of the socio-economic strengthening of African and the African Diaspora and present results.
Mode of instruction  Interactive lectures Seminars Field assignment/Desk study
PrerequisitesBlock 1 completed successfully.  
Mode of assessmentPaper Participants will write a paper on a conducted field assignment or desk study in a provided format.    Presentation Participants will present research findings according to expectations.
Assessment weightPresentation     40% Paper                   60% Please take note: both partial assessments are required to determine the final grade. Each needs to be a minimum of 5.5 in order to successfully complete the course.
Literature  Determined by lecturer
Course 6ECONOMY AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP
Contact hours/block 48h (lectures and seminars) 92h (independent study)
CodeBlock 3B
Credit points 5
AdeK LecturerDrs. Armand Zunder  (Suriname)               
K.N.U.S.T.  LecturerProf. Rev. Grace Nkansa Asante, Economics Faculty of Social Science (FoSS)
Broos LecturerTBD
Course descriptionThroughout the African Diaspora entrepreneurship experienced a certain ‘growth’ after the abolition of slavery, but also a period of ‘decline’ due to the influence of various factors, including land ownership and use. How can the economic value of land ownership and use be utilized to strengthen the position and resilience of the African Diaspora?  
Learning objectives  The participant should be able to: discuss the factors that have led to the fact that African Diaspora  crafts may or may not have developed further to the level of a medium-sized and large enterprise;analyze the contributions of the African Diaspora communities to the economic development from a historical perspective;explain the way in which African Diaspora communities have promoted their own economic resilience (e.g. via ‘microenterprise’) and explain which factors have led to its weakening.  
Mode of instruction  Interactive lectures Seminars Field assignment / Desk study / Document analysis
PrerequisitesBlock 1 completed successfully. Block3A
Mode of assessmentPaper Participants will write a paper on a conducted field assignment or desk study in a provided format.    Presentation Participants will present research findings according to expectations.  
Assessment weightPresentation     40% Paper                   60% Please take note: both partial assessments are required to determine the final grade. Each needs to be a minimum of 5.5 in order to successfully complete the course.
Literature  Determined by lecturer
BLOCK FOUR
Course 7UPBRINGING, NURTURE AND FAMILY RELATIONSHIPS
Contact hours/block48h (lectures and seminars) 92h (independent study)
CodeBlock 4A
Credit points5
AdeKUS LecturerN/A
K.N.U.S.T.  LecturerProf. Winston K. Abroampa, Faculty of Educational Studies, College of Art and Built Environment (CABE)
Broos LecturerTBD
Course description  Education and training are an essential support in the quality of the development and evolution of persons within a family, an organization or community. Which African Diasporic traditions of upbringing, nutrition and nurture, contribute to this? What role does the family play in this context? What support is desired from external persons or organizations in the event of a derailment?
Learning objectives:  The participant should be able to: give an explanation for the historical relationships between upbringing, nutrition and nurture traditions in Africa and within the African Diaspora community; based on principles within the African and African Diaspora  philosophical cultural traditions, make new and sustainable proposals for the education and training of children, young people and the elderly  
Mode of instruction  Interactive lectures Seminars Field assignment
PrerequisitesBlock 1 completed successfully.
Mode of assessmentPaper Participants will write a paper on a conducted field assignment in a provided format.  Presentation Participants will present research findings according to expectations.
Assessment weightPresentation     40% Paper                   60% Please take note: both partial assessments are required to determine the final grade. Each needs to be a minimum of 5.5 in order to successfully complete the course.
LiteratureDetermined by lecturer
Course 8POLITICAL GOVERNANCE AND LEADERSHIP
Contact hours/block48h (lectures and seminars) 92h (independent study)
CodeBlock 4B
Credit points5
AdeKUS LecturerDrs. Johannes (Hans) Breeveld (Suriname)
K.N.U.S.T.  LecturerDr. Aminu Dramani, Department of History and Political Studies, Faculty of Social Sciences
Broos LecturerTBD
Course description  This course focuses on the influence of various developments in the field of political governance and leadership; on aspects that contribute to the broadening of African Diaspora insights into, perspectives of and connections between, political governance, leadership and social change. To what extent do the aforementioned aspects contribute to the socio-cultural, socio-economic and socio-political development or strengthening of the African Diaspora?
Learning objectivesThe participant should be able to: relate the historical and revolutionary significance of the freedom uprising in Haiti to the freedom struggle in the region;shed light on the role and significance of prominent African Diaspora and African persons in relation to ‘black leadership’;assess the different forms of leadership, the significance of international memoria (such as Decade of Black Civilization, Black Lives Matter, etc.), in relation to the reinforcement of ‘black consciousness;explain the political struggles in Africa from a pan-African approach.
Mode of instructionInteractive lectures Seminars Field assignment
PrerequisitesBlock 1 completed successfully. Block 4A
Mode of assessmentPaper Participants will write a paper on a conducted field assignment in a provided format.    Presentation Participants will present research findings according to expectations.
Assessment weightPresentation     40% Paper                   60% Please take note: both partial assessments are required to determine the final grade. Each needs to be a minimum of 5.5 in order to successfully complete the course.
LiteratureDetermined by lecturer


Lecturers

 Course nameSurinamese lecturer 
1AIntroduction to African history 1Dr. Michael Nimoh K.N.U.S.T. Dept. of History and Political Studies, FoSS 
1BIntroduction to African history 2Dr. Ali Yakubu Nyaaba 
2AIdentity, ethnicity and diversityM. Silos 
2BCulture, religion and spiritualityF. Jabini 
3ANature, land ownership, traditionS. Emanuels 
3BEconomy and entrepreneurshipA. Zunder 
4AUpbringing, nurture and family relationshipsProf. Winston K. Abroampa K.N.U.S.T. Faculty of Educational Studies, College of Art and Built Environment (CABE) 
4BPolitical governance and leadershipJ. Breeveld (Political scientist)